April 17, 2014

How much do federal taxes redistribute income?

In the graph below, the closer the curve is to the gray, diagonal line the more equal the distribution. 



In the next couple of graphics, I focus on the effect on federal taxes on different income groups. 




Graphics made in OmniGraphSketcher and Adobe Illustrator. Data from Congressional Budget Office. “Trends in the Distribution of Household Income Between 1979 and 2007.” Summer 2012. http://www.cbo.gov/publication/42729.  Congressional Budget Office. “The Distribution of Household Income and Federal Taxes, 2008 and 2009.” August 2012. http://www.cbo.gov/publication/43373

Take a look at more data visualizations from my book, An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States.

March 27, 2014

Real Price of Gold since 1791–2013


The price of gold has been dropping, so, by request, here is an updated version of my gold graph from last year. Here is the original post.

March 19, 2014

Demographics of households between $30,000 and $80,000


Part of a series of graphics about the demographics of different income groups. Click to see the lower and upper-income versions.

Graphics made in OmniGraphSketcher and Adobe Illustrator. Data from US Census Bureau, 2006–2010 American Community Survey.

Take a look at more data visualizations from my book, An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States.

March 12, 2014

Demographics of households with incomes above $80,000


Graphics made in OmniGraphSketcher and Adobe Illustrator. Data from US Census Bureau, 2006–2010 American Community Survey.

Take a look at more data visualizations from my book, An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States.

Demographics of households with incomes above $80,000


Graphics made in OmniGraphSketcher and Adobe Illustrator. Data from US Census Bureau, 2006–2010 American Community Survey.

Take a look at more data visualizations from my book, An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States.

Demographics of households with incomes above $80,000


Graphics made in OmniGraphSketcher and Adobe Illustrator. Data from US Census Bureau, 2006–2010 American Community Survey.

Take a look at more data visualizations from my book, An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States.

February 14, 2014

The Defining 20 US Industries

During the course of making my book, I took a look at the GDP Industry data from the Bureau of Economics Analysis and I decided to graph the 60 years of data showing the share of each industry in the US economy. Each graph is on the same x- and y-scales to support comparisons across all of them. At the same time I thought it would be helpful to list out some of the activities found in each industry so that these charts could be used as an introduction to the dataset.  FInally, I ordered the industries from the largest to smallest across four pages.

Each area graph was created with OmniGraphSketcher and the final layout and annotations were made using Illustrator.

Datasource: US Bureau of Economic Analysis. “Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by Industry Data.” June 2012. http://www.bea.gov/industry/gdpbyind_data.htm. 

December 19, 2013

Volatility of the Highest US Incomes

For my book, I create a set of graphs that show the extreme volatility of very highest incomes over the past 10 years. Most of the data comes from the IRS directly or from IRS data collected and analyzed by Saez and Piketty for the World Top Incomes Database. However, there is a set of statistics focused on hedge fund managers that has been collected over the years by AR: Absolute Returns + Alpha that show, what I believe to be, the highest incomes in the United States.

Line graphs were create in OmniGraphSkecher and annotated in Adobe Illustrator.

December 12, 2013

Four Ways to Visualize US Income Inquality

During the course of making my book, I tried to solve the problem of representing the extreme income inequality in the United States using several different graphic approaches. In some cases, I was working with a single data set like The World Top Incomes Database or the Congressional Budget Office. In others graphics, I combined this data with data from Forbes, IRS, and AR: Absolute Returns + Alpha.

Treemap was created using R and the people icons were added in Illustrator, while the cumulative share graphs and the dot plots were create in OmniGraphSkecher.

Four Ways to Visualize US Income Inquality

During the course of making my book, I tried to solve the problem of representing the extreme income inequality in the United States using several different graphic approaches. In some cases, I was working with a single data set like The World Top Incomes Database or the Congressional Budget Office. In others graphics, I combined this data with data from Forbes, IRS, and AR: Absolute Returns + Alpha.