July 29, 2014

DesignandGeography.com

Just a quick heads up. If you have ever wondered about my secret to making maps it is my brother, Matthew Mulbrandon, an urban geographer. Well, he now runs his own site at DesignandGeography.com where you can find more about his research on urban topics particularly housing and transportation. And of course more original maps about any topics that catch his fancy.

July 4, 2014

Average Household Income by US Counties

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A simple map of Average Household Income by county

Graphics made in OmniGraphSketcher and Adobe Illustrator. Data from US Census Bureau, 2006–2010 American Community Survey.

Take a look at more data visualizations from my book, An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States.

June 2, 2014

Jersey City 2014 Budget in 4 Easy Graphs

Recently joined OpenJC, a Code for America brigade, and for my first project I worked with Anna Lukasiak to create a set of graphs the 2014 Jersey City Municipal budget for a Budget Forum run by CivicJC.

We began with a scanned pdf which Anna converted into a set of Excel spreadsheets and loaded the data into interactive treemaps. I then made the following four basic charts as an introduction to the revenue and spending of the Jersey City Municipal Government.

The first graph compares the municipal budget to the JC agency budgets. Then a simple stacked bar chart to compare the major revenue sources vs the city spending. Final two charts provide more detail into the revenue and spending 

Data can be found on our project page.


The Board of Education budget is approximately 150 million dollars more than the city’s municipal budget however most of the funding for the schools is from NJ state government. 


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The top 3 sources of revenue for Jersey City (80%) are property taxes, abatements (properties with tax breaks offered to owners/developers) and state aid. While 71% of the spending goes to 5 major items: police, health insurance, debt payments, fire, and pensions.


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The other revenues for the city, the bottom 20%, are from licenses, fees, permits, sale of land, taxes collect for library etc…


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Finally, while the automatous agencies have separate budgets, they will receive payments from the city which cover some of their costs. For example the Incinerator Authority gets $34 million while the Library get $8 million and the Parking Authority get around $1 million.


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Top 400 Taxpayers: Sources of Income 1992-2005

This graph shows the different types of income of the “Top 400” from 1992-2005. Number one source of income is Capital Gains, which accounts for more than 50% of their income in 2005. The “Top 400” are the 400 tax returns with the highest adjusted gross income reported to the IRS.


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Data from the IRS via Wall Street Journal’s Tax Report

Average Tax Rates for Married with Two Kids and One Income: 2009

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The sixth in series of infographics I am designing to illustrate the average federal tax rate applied to different salaries. This time I am graphing the average tax rates for a married couple with to kids and one salary. With 2 kids there are 2 more exemptions which increases the income tax cut offs for all tax brackets compared to the married with no children graphic.

If you take a look at your W-2 form you can see that there are 3 different taxes applied to salaries and wages:



The income tax graph is created from the 2009 tax schedule for a couple filing jointly or qualifying widow(er):



which you can find from the IRS Tax Tables here while the information about the social security and medicare tax can be found here.

Average Tax Rates up to $400,000 for Single Filers: 2009

UPDATE 3/17/2010: I added more information about marginal tax rates by graphing the combined marginal tax rate line in the last graph. Also clarified that the employer-side of the payroll taxes are not included The first of series of infographics I am designing to illustrate the average federal tax rate applied to different salaries. I want to show how the marginal income tax rates + social security and medicare taxes combine together for a single taxpayer up to $400,000. (This graphic does not include payroll taxes paid by the employer.)


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A little background about this data. If you take a look at your W-2 form you can see that there are 3 different taxes applied to salaries and wages:



The income tax graph is created from the 2009 tax schedule for a single taxpayer:



which you can find from the IRS Tax Tables here while the information about the social security and medicare tax can be found here.

Average Tax Rates for Head of Household: 2009

The fifth in series of infographics I am designing to illustrate the average federal tax rate applied to different salaries. This time I am graphing the average tax rates for a Head of Household with one child. The difference between this graph and the couple with one income is the smaller standard deduction and lower cut offs for 10%, 15%, 25%, and 28% rates both of which raises their average income tax rate.

The income tax graph is created from the 2009 tax schedule for a Head of Household:


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which you can find from the IRS Tax Tables here while the information about the social security and medicare tax can be found here.

Comparing Marginal Tax Rates Including Payroll Taxes: 2009

Updated April 13, 2010:  I don’t think my original labels were clear so I tried to fix it with new labels and I reorder the graphs. This is a new infographic illustrating the marginal federal tax rate applied to different salaries. It shows the difference between the combined rate levied on an employee (Income + SSN + Medicare marginal tax rate) and the additional rate levied on the employer, i.e. the payroll tax (SSN + Medicare tax) I am using the same examples that I created in the previous six graphics looking at the average tax rate.


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May 30, 2014

Average Tax Rates for Married Couple with Two Incomes: 2009

The third in series of infographics I am designing to illustrate the average federal tax rate applied to different salaries. This time I am graphing the average tax rates for married couples filing a joint tax return but with 2 incomes (same salary for each). The difference between this graph and the couple with one income is that the the Social Security Tax cut off is now $213,600 (instead of $106,800), which increases their average SSN tax rate and their combined tax rates.


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The income tax graph is created from the 2009 tax schedule for a couple filing jointly or qualifying widow(er):



which you can find from the IRS Tax Tables here while the information about the social security and medicare tax can be found here.

Average Tax Rates for Married Couples with One Income: 2009

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The second in series of infographics I am designing to illustrate the average federal tax rate applied to different salaries. This time I am graphing the average tax rates for a married couple filing a joint tax return. I am assuming one income so the main change from the tax rate for singles is the amount of the standard deduction, 2 exemptions and the change to the income tax schedule. (Again, this graphic does not include any payroll taxes paid by the employer.)

If you take a look at your W-2 form you can see that there are 3 different taxes applied to salaries and wages:



The income tax graph is created from the 2009 tax schedule for a couple filing jointly or qualifying widow(er):



which you can find from the IRS Tax Tables here while the information about the social security and medicare tax can be found here.